Climate records written on the seafloor

Featured image: A perspective view of the seafloor at the East Pacific Rise, 9N. Made with GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org, CC-BY), and GMRT topography data (Ryan et al. 2009, CC-BY).

Paper: Do sea level variations influence mid-ocean ridge magma supply? A test using crustal thickness and bathymetry data from the East Pacific Rise
Authors: B. Boulahanis, S. M. Carbotte, P. J. Huybers, M. R. Nedimovic, O. Aghaei, J. P. Canales, and C. H. Langmuir

Many of our records of past sea level come from local measurements from coastal towns logged over decades or centuries, or are estimated from ice or sediment cores spanning the last few thousand years, but new research suggests that much longer records can be found in an unlikely place: imprinted deep underground in the oceanic crust.

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How to locate oceanic earthquakes without getting your feet wet

Photo of a fence offset by fault slip on the San Andreas during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

Featured image: A fence broken by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, by G. K. Gilbert. Public domain.

For the millions of people living near the San Andreas fault zone in California, the billion-dollar question is when the next “big one” is going to happen.

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How Algae Emissions Could Affect the Weather

Featured image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, Public Domain

Paper: Unprecedented DMSP Concentrations in a Massive Dinoflagellate Bloom in Monterey Bay, CA
Authors: Ronald P. Kiene, Brent Nowinski, Kaitlin Esson, Christina Preston, Roman Marin III, James Birch, Christopher Scholin, John Ryan, and Mary Ann Moran

Tiny marine organisms have been showing up in higher and higher numbers in bodies of water. These organisms also emit sulfur-containing compounds – and if they emit enough sulfur, their emissions could affect the climate. Continue reading “How Algae Emissions Could Affect the Weather”